UC releases cost-return studies on alfalfa, wine grapes, corn

UC releases cost-return studies on alfalfa, wine grapes, corn

The alfalfa study outlines the costs and returns for producing alfalfa under flood irrigation in the Sacramento and northern San Joaquin valleys.  The wine grape study focuses on establishment and production costs in the central region of the Sierra Nevada foothills.

University of California (UC) Agriculture and Natural Resources economists have completed five new cost and return studies on wine grapes, alfalfa under flood irrigation, field corn, plus two on irrigated pasture.

The alfalfa study outlines the costs and returns for producing alfalfa under flood irrigation in the Sacramento and northern San Joaquin valleys. The study is based on furrow irrigation and Roundup Ready alfalfa seed, and covers Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Sutter, and Yolo counties.

A cost study is available for field corn for grain production in the southern San Joaquin Valley, including Kern, Kings, and Tulare counties.

The wine grape study focuses on establishment and production costs in the central region of the Sierra Nevada foothills, focusing on the red wine varieties on bilateral cordon vineyards in Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, and Tuolumne counties.

The majority of the vineyard production operations are performed by a vineyard management company.

Two new cost and return studies focus on irrigated pasture for hay and grazing in the Sacramento Valley, including Butte, Colusa, Glenn, Nevada, Placer, Shasta, Sutter, Tehama, Trinity, and Yuba counties.

One study covers tilled and no-till planting methods while the other is for pasture production for high intensity grazing and harvesting hay.

These and other crop production costs are available at http://coststudies.ucdavis.edu.

Some archived studies are available on the website http://coststudies.ucdavis.edu/archived.php

For more information, contact UC ANR Cooperative Extension specialist Karen Klonsky at (530) 752-3589 and [email protected]

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