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"No Taste for Waste' campaign aims to reduce food waste

USDA estimates up to 40% of all food produced is lost to waste in the United States.

A new collaborative effort to reduce food waste and loss, “No Taste for Waste,” has been launched.

The campaign features interactive website, special edition “bookazine” and social media resources for consumers interested in reducing household food waste, and for farmers and ranchers who are taking steps to fight food loss in their fields.

The campaign connects consumers to farmers who work hard to use sustainable practices and act as good stewards of the land, while reducing food waste.

“Farmers and ranchers are leading the charge toward greater efficiency and less waste in our food system, from field to fork,” said AFBF President Zippy Duvall. “By adopting technology in our fields and new farming practices, we are reducing waste while producing high-quality, healthy food.” 

“Waste Less, Save Money!” Bookazine

A bookazine, titled “Waste Less, Save Money!” is an illustrated publication that includes recipes, meal planning tips and stories about how farmers use innovative ag technology to reduce waste on the farm and in their communities. Consumers can find it at newsstands nationwide beginning in April 2018. 

The publication will provide readers the opportunity to learn about people like Brett Reinford, a dairy farmer in Pennsylvania, who powers his farm and more than 100 other homes with energy from food waste processed in a digester. They can also read about Luella Gregory, a cattle farmer and soon-to-be cookbook author in Iowa, who educates elementary school kids about sustainability and how technology makes farms more efficient. Six other farm families are profiled in the bookazine, along with tips for decreasing food waste, straight from the people who grow our food.

Digital and social engagement

The accompanying website, NoTasteForWaste.org, brings the bookazine to life. Consumers will have access to a weekly meal planner, online tools to help reduce waste at home and more stories from farmers who are combating food waste and loss. A growing collection of recipes from farmers, bloggers and test kitchens will also be highlighted on the site. In addition, consumers and farmers can share their stories and food preservation tips using #NoTasteForWaste on Facebook (@NoTasteForWaste) and Instagram (@NoTaste4Waste). 

Hot topic

Consumers are increasingly aware of the environmental, economic and social price tags attached to food waste. Food waste reduction is set to become a hot trend at restaurants, grocery stores and home kitchens in 2018, according to the National Restaurant Association, Forbes Magazine and Food & Wine Magazine. In the United States, up to 40% of all food produced is lost to waste, according to USDA estimates.

Source: American Farm Bureau Federation

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