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Conceding to Prop 37 anti-science agenda not acceptable

Yes, Monsanto ponied up $4.2 million to defeat Proposition 37, the anti-science, anti-food initiative on the November California ballot.

Ditto for DuPont’s $1.3 million; Dow AgroSciences’ $1.2 million and the list goes on. What do you expect them to do? Concede to a boatload of self-serving socialists out of touch with reality?

Stacy Malkan, media director for the California Right to Know campaign, calls Proposition 37 "an epic food fight between the pesticide companies and consumers who want to know what's in their food."

Let’s end this fight right now. 100 percent of what we eat is genetically modified, either through conventional breeding or biotechology. As far as I can tell, no one has become ill or died from eating genetically modified food.

Why go to the ballot box? Because an ambulance chasing attorney and a pack of snake oil companies want to line their own pockets. And there’s the likes of Mercola Health Resources run by Chicago osteopath and self-styled alternative medicine apostle Joseph Mercola, who promotes his sketchy supplements [3]through his online health newsletter. Mercola has donated $800,000 to the campaign, according to Ronald Bailey of reason.com.

Despite that and all the scientific evidence to the contrary, the California Business Roundtable and Pepperdine University School of Public Policy report that an amazing 65 percent of California’s voters support Proposition 37. Common sense has left California.

You don’t have to look further than another infamous ballot initiative, Proposition 215 (the Compassionate Use Act of 1996) to validate that. California voters legalized marijuana for medical uses with that fine proposition. It gave drug cartels a license to plant marijuana throughout California for sale nationwide. It is a law enforcement nightmare that has prompted gunfights and killings and has put California law in direct conflict with federal statutes.

(For more, see: California’s growing marijuana business impacting agriculture [4])

"Ninety-five percent” of these medical marijuana farms “are criminal operations," said Tulare County, Calif., sheriff's Lt. Tom Sigley in a recent Fresno Bee article. "I have yet to see a legitimate caregiver." The same type of activist who supported the marijuana initiative is behind Proposition 37.

The anti-Proposition 37 campaign is fighting back and is winning editorial support from many newspapers. The defeat-Proposition 37 strategy is to focus on a flawed law written by a shifty lawyer that will raise food prices and create marketing chaos.

However, the strategy is not what I call junkyard dog [5] stuff. Hope it works. Bailey takes the junkyard dog approach at http://reason.com/archives/2012/08/14/california-initiative-puts-profit-ahead [6].

One of the most galling things in the Proposition 37 propaganda is the portrayal of Monsanto, DuPont, Dow AgroScience and others as ominous megacorporations out to destroy the world.

These corporations employ thousands of people: Monsanto 23,000; DuPont 60,000; and Dow AgroSciences 6,700. When the leader of the Proposition 37 band of marauders talks about “giant pesticide and food companies being afraid of the mothers and grandmothers who want the right to know what’s in our food,” they are talking about mothers, grandmothers, moms and dads who work for these corporations. I cannot imagine these moms, dads, etc. wanting to destroy their families for a paycheck.

I want to collectively shake each California voter with a “Wake up!” Discern what you read in today’s newspapers and hear from rip-and-read television anchors. Use a little common sense.