Ethanol export debate looks to heat up

Ethanol export debate looks to heat up

@font-face { font-family: "Times"; [email protected] { font-family: "Cambria"; }p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal { margin: 0in 0in 10pt; font-size: 12pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }p { margin-right: 0in; margin-left: 0in; font-size: 10pt; font-family: "Times New Roman"; }div.Section1 { page: Section1; } The blender’s tax credit is set to expire at the end of 2010 and will play a major role in the ethanol debate. U.S. ethanol exports typically go to Canada, the Netherlands, the U.A.E., the U.K., and Saudi Arabia.

With an ever-increasing amount of U.S. ethanol bound for foreign shores, controversy is mounting over the blender’s tax credit and its use by exporters. Set to expire at the end of 2010, the blenders’ tax credit will play a major role in the ethanol debate.

U.S. ethanol exports typically go to Canada, the Netherlands, the U.A.E., the U.K., and Saudi Arabia.

To read more about the ethanol export dispute, see Gregory Meyer’s article [3] in the Financial Times.